How Accurate are Vision Screenings?

If you have a child in school they have probably had a vision screening. These are generally performed by a pediatrician, or a nurse if done at school. It’s important to note that these are rarely performed by a vision specialist or optometrist.  A vision screening is usually part of a school general physical. This is an opportunity to note any physical issues and may lead to a referral to an eye doctor, although they do not offer a diagnosis or treatment plan.

The Good and Bad of School Vision Screenings

The American Optometric Association says:

  1. Schools screenings provide <4% of the vision tests needed to help a child see.
  2. Miss up to 75% of children with vision problems.
  3. Of the children found to have eye problems through screening, 61% never visit the eye doctor.

School vision screenings are limited, but are typically able to detect issues such as myopia (nearsightedness) and amblyopia (lazy eye). Amblyopia is a visual issue that requires an optometrist with speciality training. Vision screenings often fall short diagnosing visual issues that have an impact on learning, reading and classroom performance. Issues like hyperopia (farsightedness), binocular vision (eye teaming) disorders, eye tracking and eye focusing can have a significant impact on visual functioning for learning.

What to do after a Vision Screening

Your child has had a vision screening so what now?

If your child has failed any portion of the vision screening, it’s necessary for them to see an optometrist or other eye care specialist. If there is suspicion of a visual issue impacting learning, your child may likely need to see an optometrist who specializes in vision therapy and binocular vision. Optometrists who specialize in treating visual issues that affect learning are called developmental or functional optometrists.

What does a Developmental Optometrist Do?

A developmental optometrist specializes in vision therapy. Vision therapy has been scientifically proven to treat and remediate a number of learning-related vision issues. COVD is a website dedicated to the advancement of vision therapy and the prevention, enhancement, and rehabilitation of functional visual issues.

Below you’ll find the full article on vision screenings and how they are insufficient in detecting a number of significant visual issues.

HPI American Optometric Association Issue Brief: “Vision Screen: Should Be Called “Amblyopia Screening”